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Tool Kit Preferences For Gilroy Chiefs??


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I just received a 'Great Escape' tool kit (Voted World's Most Amazing Tool Kit! Guaranteed Forever!) from Indian-Charlotte, that I found on their site when I was ordering a new choke cable, and it's going back to Charlotte today. Looked good on the screen, especially since they stated that it was geared to Gilroy era bikes. I was expecting something of a little better quality since it was coming from a respectable Indian dealer, even if it did only cost 40 bucks. (That should've been the only red flag I needed. DOH!) I couldn't even get the doohickey that the bits connect to to swing out. As a retired Ironworker, I've always bought good, high quality, preferably American made tool brands like Klein, Armstrong, Wright, and until last year, Craftsman (now made in China. Greed strikes again).

 

I posted on the 'General Discussion' forum because I know ;there are a lot of guys who used to own Gilroy's that may not read that section much anymore.

 

What do/did you all carry in your Gilroy on-board tool kits? Is there a decent tool kit that's oriented to the Gilroy's? What's the recommended list for your bike? I've seen kits on different bike parts site's, and I'm thinking I'm just going to have to make my own and stick it in a roll up bag, but I'd like to get it right and keep it small enough to hold in my 4"x10" fork bag. Thanks for any comments or suggestions from you guys who have had to deal with these bikes on the road. Also, is there a good quality, small multimeter that you include in your set? And while I'm at it, what electrical relays, etc do/did you carry in your stuff that have come in handy? Thanks again! Lee

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Here's the radio shack miniature multimeter that I've been using [kept in my office] for quite a few years now. Normally just ride local along the coast around here these days so, other than a couple small allen wrenches I don't carry tools.

 

 

 

https://www.radioshack.com/products/radioshack-22-range-pocket-digital-multimeter?variant=5717084229

 

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I just have a roll with misc stuff in my bagmost every wrench Ive used on the bike medium quality as I have had on tool bag stolen already

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I just have a roll with misc stuff in my bagmost every wrench Ive used on the bike medium quality as I have had on tool bag stolen already

Me too. several wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers in a roll. Had it for years.

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I have the Beza Windzone tool kit. It has just about everything you need and decent quality and it rolls up and fits perfectly inside a front fork bag. $90 at www.motorcycle-superstore.com.

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I have the WindZone...bought it with my Gilroy and fits in a Chilhowee Leather deluxe tool roll bag.... took them off my Kings Mountain and did not mount on Spirit Lake bike....I throw it in saddlebag for long rides. Mine is the ESSENTIAL TOOL KIT. I added a couple things like blue loctite, some zip ties, and a couple allen wrenches for seat and cowling that covers items under seat and for dash panel.

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The tools I keep on my Gilroy were built up over the years as I figured out what I may need on the road to get me back home. Not top-notch tools, because I've lost some while riding, but good enough in a pinch.

I keep them in a cheap, leather tool bag.

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Like others have said, don't get too carried away with high quality tools for the "quick fix" I learned the hard way about 5-6 years ago when I lost over 1.5-K in Snap-On / Mac hand tools when a tool roll came off along with the stock sissy-bar, now it's set of Matco allen-sockets, Snap-On ratchet, Costco ratcheting wrenches & Harbor Freight screw drivers... toss in a few cable-ties & a cheap multi-meter

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The things i used THE MOST on my Gilroy:

 

- blue loctite to put on the dash panel screw, headlight bezel screw, seat tab bolt, shift linkage.

- spare small hose clamps for 3/8 lines

- electrical tape for fixing burnt wires under dash panel and in handlebars

- starter relay

- IIRA card for roadside assistance

- phone number of IIRA members within an hour of my ride

- allen wrench's that fit seat bolts, dash panel bolts, primary cover and trans cover bolts

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Is there a meme for a Snap-On Garage sized tool box trailer?

 

Seriously, I kept two spare relays with one of those cheap 4 in 1 screwdrivers, a set of allen wrenches, needle-nosed and regular set of pliers, decent wire stripper and crimper, various electrical splicers and connectors, electrical tape, two adjustable wrenches (small and medium),blue loctite, and a length of rubber hose (good for fuel or oil). I might have kept more but these items stand out in my memory.

 

Enjoy the ride. Many days I miss riding my Gilroy.

 

Ride safe,

Vagabond

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I used to pull my tool box behind me wherever I went...

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half my left saddle bag is a tool kit, i can rebuild and rewire most of the bike on the side of the road but some how never have the tool i need.

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Yeah red & blue loctight is a must, I do carry more tools if I'm crossing state lines... I changed a trans in Tejas & lifters in S.C. one year all with the tools I carried, I even had lifter block alignment pins in the saddlebag...

 

INDIAN : Making wrenches out of riders for over 100 ears :nod:

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I always thought a chaser car towing a spare motorcycle would be a good thing when going long distance on my Gilroy.

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I always thought a chaser car towing a spare motorcycle would be a good thing when going long distance on my Gilroy.

 

Or have a friend on stand by

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Craftsman makes a decent tool kit, $100 or so. Starter relay, blue Locktight, zip ties, starter relay, alarm relay, tire repair kit (running tubeless) and my most used tool: a set 3/8" drive Alan wrenches. Can't remember if the tool kit has anything 10 mm or not but you need that for battery terminals. Don't ask me how I know that. In the last week...... :nod:

 

Hork

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Thanks VERY much to everybody for the detailed lists! (and the scary thought of needing to take my whole tool box with me). I guess the previous owner (s)?? must have had this bike gone over pretty well, because except for a few minor things, I've yet to have too many problems. I know it was built toward the end of the run, so maybe they'd worked out a lot of bugs, but with all the upgrades and add on's that guy put on here, I'm hoping he did most of the de-bugging for me. Thanks again for the list. I've always been the kind of guy who carries way too much 'just in case', whether it's a job I'm doing, camping/hiking, etc. But there's no use taking a wagon load of tools that will just be hanging on the forks as dead weight.

 

Brock, you mentioned Chilhowee, which is wear I just got my fork bag from. They were on clearance and pretty much matched the thousands of chrome studs (seems like) that had been incorporated into this bike before I got it. And fringe. (No fringe on the bag). My windshield bag keeps my personal stuff, the bags are for leathers and 'go to the store' junk (and beer, when needed), so the fork bag will stop me from having to dig for that one or two tools that I've carried up to this point, knowing damn well that it would be the thing I didn't bring that I'd need instead.

 

Habin- I'm impressed! (if you're serious). Thanks again, all!

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Don't forget the vice grips, so you can clamp onto the broken throttle wire and lever it over the handle bars.

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Don't forget the vice grips, so you can clamp onto the broken throttle wire and lever it over the handle bars.

I just wrapped it around my hand a couple times, what a bitch to ride like that though, luckily I only had to ride about 20 miles, but getting off the hill from the curb in Virginia city during street vibrations bike rally made it way interesting.

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Haha...I got lucky with the broken throttle.

I pulled into my garage, hit the kill switch, and the throttle grip fell off. Broken into a few pieces.

I had to laugh about that one.

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Don't forget the vice grips, so you can clamp onto the broken throttle wire and lever it over the handle bars.

Yeowch!! (I just replace my throttle and idle cables when I replaced the carb. Hope Guy picked out some good ones!)

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