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Kerry's own words; "the new soldier"


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Know who you are voting for.

 

Not what people say he said; not what he said he said, read what he wrote from his own heart and mind.

 

Since its publication in 1971, John Kerry's book "The New Soldier" has acquired almost legendary status. Rumors abound of political operatives scrambling to locate and suppress stray copies during Kerry's House campaign in 1972. Copies now sell on Ebay for upwards of $750!

 

John F. Kerry has made his Vietnam service the cornerstone of his campaign for President. But he has said virtually nothing about what he did when he came home. His activities and statements at the time painted our veterans with an undeserved bloody brush. Many believe that the activities of John Kerry, Jane Fonda and others actually prolonged the war, resulting in the unnecessary deaths of hundreds of our soldiers, and thousands of Vietnamese.

 

Before you decide how to vote in the forthcoming election, I urge you to consider all the information you can find in order to make an informed decision. To make this book widely available, I am providing completely FREE access to a PDF version.The PDF document includes the text of the original book, and supplemental material. You can read it, print it, send a copy to others, or save a copy to your PC. You need Acrobat Reader v.5.0 or higher, also free, to open this document.

 

http://freekerrybook.com/

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Know who you are voting for.

I agreee 100% ....

 

We should know who we are voting for.  And as long as we keep bringing up military service.... lets keep things in perspective.. During the Vietnam War, instead of conscription to the Agent Oranged jungles of Southeast Asia – Bush instead bravely volunteered to jump to the front of the Texas Air National Guard waiting list. There, His genetic predisposition to leadership was quickly acknowledged with a fabulously rare special commission to 2nd Lieutenant, rightfully catapulting Him past the stiflingly bureaucratic folly of Officer's Training School. A devoted patriot, Bush quickly mastered the controls of his obsolete F-102 "Delta Dagger" fighter jet, dominating the skies of the Lone Star State's front lines and defending countless pregnant women and helpless kittens from sorties of Eastern Airlines tactical "whisper jets." So exemplary was His militarism, in fact, Bush saw fit to reward Himself with a 12-month A.W.O.L. vacation prior to being granted a special honorable discharge in the fall of 1973.

 

 

I cant agree with you more.  Find out as much as you can before you vote..

 

Semper Fi

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Know who you are voting for.

I agreee 100% ....

 

We should know who we are voting for.  And as long as we keep bringing up military service.... lets keep things in perspective.. During the Vietnam War, instead of conscription to the Agent Oranged jungles of Southeast Asia – Bush instead bravely volunteered to jump to the front of the Texas Air National Guard waiting list. There, His genetic predisposition to leadership was quickly acknowledged with a fabulously rare special commission to 2nd Lieutenant, rightfully catapulting Him past the stiflingly bureaucratic folly of Officer's Training School. A devoted patriot, Bush quickly mastered the controls of his obsolete F-102 "Delta Dagger" fighter jet, dominating the skies of the Lone Star State's front lines and defending countless pregnant women and helpless kittens from sorties of Eastern Airlines tactical "whisper jets." So exemplary was His militarism, in fact, Bush saw fit to reward Himself with a 12-month A.W.O.L. vacation prior to being granted a special honorable discharge in the fall of 1973.

 

 

I cant agree with you more.  Find out as much as you can before you vote..

 

Semper Fi

Your full of SHIT!

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Know who you are voting for.

I agreee 100% ....

 

We should know who we are voting for.  And as long as we keep bringing up military service.... lets keep things in perspective.. During the Vietnam War, instead of conscription to the Agent Oranged jungles of Southeast Asia – Bush instead bravely volunteered to jump to the front of the Texas Air National Guard waiting list. There, His genetic predisposition to leadership was quickly acknowledged with a fabulously rare special commission to 2nd Lieutenant, rightfully catapulting Him past the stiflingly bureaucratic folly of Officer's Training School. A devoted patriot, Bush quickly mastered the controls of his obsolete F-102 "Delta Dagger" fighter jet, dominating the skies of the Lone Star State's front lines and defending countless pregnant women and helpless kittens from sorties of Eastern Airlines tactical "whisper jets." So exemplary was His militarism, in fact, Bush saw fit to reward Himself with a 12-month A.W.O.L. vacation prior to being granted a special honorable discharge in the fall of 1973.

 

 

I cant agree with you more.  Find out as much as you can before you vote..

 

Semper Fi

Bush A Military “Deserter?” Calm Down, Michael

Clark backer Michael Moore calls President Bush a “deserter” for missing Air National Guard drills 31 years ago. Puh-lease!

 

January 23, 2004

Modified:February 11, 2004

Summary

 

This one has been around since Bush’s campaign against Al Gore, when a Boston Globe story appeared saying the newspaper could find no record of Bush attending required Air National Guard drills for a full year in 1972-73. Bush says he missed some weekend drills during the period in question, but attended others and later attended extra drills to make up for those he missed. Several news organizations looked into the matter and reached mixed conclusions.

 

Websites devoted to criticizing Bush have kept the matter under discussion on the Internet ever since. It surfaced again when Michael Moore, the populist author and movie and TV producer, called Bush a “deserter” at a rally supporting retired Gen. Wesley Clark in New Hampshire. Clark then said during a debate that “I think Michael Moore has the right to say whatever he feels about this.”

 

The fact is Bush was honorably discharged without ever being officially accused of desertion or being away without official leave.

 

(Note: On Feb. 10 Bush released previously undisclosed payroll and personnel records covering his service in 1973-73. See our separate  article.)

 

Analysis

 

"The Top 5%"

 

After graduating from Yale in 1968, Bush escaped conscription and possible combat duty in the then-raging Vietnam War by getting into the Texas Air National Guard. During the next four years Bush served the equivalent of 21 months on active duty, according to the Globe account, including more than a year of flight training. The Globe quoted Bush’s flight instructor, retired Col. Maurice H. Udell, as saying "I would rank him in the top 5 percent of pilots I knew.”

 

The Globe also said:

 

Those who trained and flew with Bush . . . said he was among the best pilots in the 111th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron. In the 22-month period between the end of his flight training and his move to Alabama, Bush logged numerous hours of duty, well above the minimum requirements for so-called "weekend warriors."

 

"Began to Disappear"

 

But the Globe said Bush “began to disappear from the Guard’s radar screen” with two years still to run on his six-year commitment, giving up flying for good in 1972. Bush moved from Houston to Alabama in May of 1972 to take part in the unsuccessful Senate campaign of Republican Winton Blount. Bush was supposed to report for duty at the 187th Tactical Recon Group in Montgomery Alabama. But the unit’s commander at the time, retired Gen. William Turnipseed, was quoted by several news organizations as saying he had no recollection of Bush showing up. "I had been in Texas, done my  flight training there. If we had had a first lieutenant from Texas, I would have remembered," the Globe quoted him saying.

 

The Globe quoted Bush as saying through his spokesman Dan Bartlett that he did recall reporting for non-flying duty in Alabama, performing “odds and ends” under supervisors whose names he could not recall.

 

"I Fulfilled My Obligations"

 

Bush himself later was quoted directly by the Dallas Morning News as admitting he missed some weekend drills while in Alabama, but saying he made them up afterward:

 

"I was there on a temporary assignment and fulfilled my weekends at one period of time," he said. "I made up some missed weekends."

 

"I can't remember what I did, but I wasn't flying because they didn't have the same airplanes. I fulfilled my obligations."

 

Records are lacking for that period. However, The Associated Press  quoted two friends who worked with Bush in the Blount campaign as saying they recall him attending Air National Guard drills in Alabama. Joe Holcombe, described as a former Republican county chairman in Alabama, was quoted as saying, "It was pretty well-known that he was in the Guard while we worked on the campaign." And Emily Marks, who said she had dated Bush during the campaign, was quoted saying, "He told us that he was having to do his Guard duty in Alabama while he worked on the campaign." (Note: The AP originally gave the woman's name as Emily Martin, but later corrected that to Emily Marks.)

 

Bush returned to Houston after the campaign, but never resumed flying. He spent 36 days on duty back in Houston in May, June and July of 1973, the Globe reported. Spokesman Bartlett told FactCheck.org that Bush made up for weekend drills he was too busy to attend in Alabama. "The bottom line is he met his minimum requirments for that year," Bartlett said.

 

Bush requested and was granted special permission to end his six-year hitch eight months early. He was released in October 1973 to to allow him to attend Harvard Business School.

 

Reporters Dig In

 

After the Globe story, partisan websites denounced Bush as “AWOL” and worse. One is even named AwolBush.com . But other news organizations dug in and came to much milder conclusions.

 

George Magazine reported in October of 2000:

 

It's time to set the record straight . . . . Bush may have received favorable treatment to get into the Guard, served irregularly after the spring of 1972 and got an expedited discharge, but he did accumulate the days of service required of him for his ultimate honorable discharge.

 

The New York Times reported Nov. 3, 2000:

 

But a review of records by The New York Times indicated that some of those concerns (about Bush’s absence) may be unfounded . . . . A review by The Times showed that after a seven-month gap, he appeared for duty in late November 1972 at least through July 1973.

 

The Washington Post also reviewed records and concluded:

 

It is safe to say that Bush did very light duty in his last two years in the Guard and that his superiors made it easy for him.

 

Some Democratic partisans have taken a much harsher view.

 

Democrats.com , a website that sells “Impeach Bush Now” bumper stickers, posted a rebuttal to the George Magazine piece saying “There is no credible evidence that Bush ever reported for duty for the last two years of his military obligation” and suggested “substance abuse as the most likely explanation.”

 

Michael Moore: "General vs. Deserter"

 

Michael Moore, in his bestselling book Stupid White Men, included an open letter to President Bush calling him "a possible felon, an unconvicted deserter, and a crybaby."

 

Moore took it even further during a New Hampshire rally for Clark Jan. 17, predicting Clark would face Bush in the general election. “I want to see that debate, the general versus the deserter,” Moore said with Clark looking on.

 

Moore ’s "deserter" remark prompted ABC News Anchor Peter Jennings to confront Clark at a Democratic candidates debate Jan. 22:

 

Jennings: Now, that's a reckless charge not supported by the facts. And I was curious to know why you didn't contradict him . . .

 

Clark:  Well, I think Michael Moore has the right to say whatever he feels about this.I don't know whether this is supported by the facts or not. I've never looked at it. I've seen this charge bandied about a lot. But to me it wasn't material . . .

 

Jennings: Since this question and answer in which you and Mr. Moore was involved in, you've had a chance to look at the facts. Do you still feel comfortable with the fact that someone should be standing up in your presence and calling the president of the United States a deserter?

 

Clark: To be honest with you, I did not look at the facts, Peter. You know, that's Michael Moore's opinion. He's entitled to say that. I've seen -- he's not the only person who's said that. I've not followed up on those facts. And frankly, it's not relevant to me and why I'm in this campaign.

 

Clark ’s reluctance to contradict Moore was criticized the next day by the newspaper that started it all, the Boston Globe, which said in an editorial:

 

News reports, including some in the Globe , have questioned Bush's constancy as a National Guard airman at the time, but he has not been credibly accused of desertion, a serious charge. Clark should have distanced himself from the remark.

 

Sources

 

 

Walter V. Robinson “One-year gap in Bush’s Guard duty : No records of airman at drills in 1972-73,” Boston Globe 23 May 2000: A1.

 

Wayne Slater "Records of Bush's Ala. Military Service Can't Be Found," Dallas Morning News 26 June 2000: A6.

 

The Associated Press "Friends from Alabama days back Bush's military claims," Houston Chronicle 5 July 2000: A17.

 

Peter Keating and Karthik Thyagarajan “The Real Military Record of George W. Bush: Not Heroic, but Not AWOL, Either ,” George Magazine October 2000.

 

Jo Thomas “The 2000 Campaign: Military Service; Bush’s Guard attendance is Questioned and Defended,” New York Times 3 Nov. 2000: A27.

 

Bob Fertik “George Magazine is Wrong,” Democrats.com website, no date given.

 

George Lardner Jr.; Howard Kurtz “2 Democrats: Bush Let Guard Down; Gore Surrogates Revive Issue of Apparent Laxity in Candidate's Military Service,” The Washington Post 3 Nov. 2000 : A22.

 

Eric Slater, “Clark Showcases Mixed Bag of Backers in New Hampshire ;Filmmakers, former Clinton advisors and others stump for the Democratic hopeful” Los Angeles Times 18 Jan. 2004: A23.

 

“Answers Beat Questions,” Boston Globe editorial 23 Jan. 2004.

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New Evidence Supports Bush Military Service (Mostly)

Newly released records reflect payments and credits for Air National Guard service meeting minimum requirements, despite a six-month gap.

 

February 11, 2004

Modified:February 15, 2004

Summary

 

 

With Democrats openly accusing President Bush of being "AWOL" from his Air National Guard service during the 1970's, the White House released personnel and payroll records showing Bush was paid and credited for service during the period in question. And despite a six-month gap in service while working on a Senate campaign in Alabama, Air Force Reserve records show Bush was credited with enough points to meet his requirements for that year -- barely.

 

Analysis

 

 

The controversy over President Bush's military record has been heating up since Michael Moore called President Bush a "deserter," (see our earlier article ).

 

Democrats Make "AWOL" Allegation a Campaign Issue

 

Democratic National Committee chairman Terry McAuliffe repeatedly accused the President of being “AWOL” in nationally televised interviews.

 

On Fox News, January 21:

 

McAuliffe: George Bush never showed up. He was AWOL from the Alabama National Guard. He didn't fight in any battles and General Clark did. So I will put General Clark up against George Bush any day of the week.

 

And on ABC "This Week" February 1:

 

McAuliffe: I look forward to that debate when John Kerry, a war hero with a chest full of medals, is standing next to George Bush, a man who was AWOL in the Alabama National Guard. George Bush never served in our military and our country. He didn't show up when he should have showed up.

 

President Bush defended his service in another nationally television interview, on NBC's "Meet the Press" Feb.  8:

 

Tim Russert: The Boston Globe and The Associated Press have gone through some of the records and said there’s no evidence that you reported to duty in Alabama during the summer and fall of 1972.

 

Bush:  Yeah, they’re — they're just wrong.  There may be no evidence, but I did report; otherwise, I wouldn't have been honorably discharged.  In other words, you don't just say "I did something" without there being verification.  Military doesn't work that way.  I got an honorable discharge, and I did show up in Alabama.

 

Russert: You did — were allowed to leave eight months before your term expired.  Was there a reason?

 

Bush:  Right.  Well, I was going to Harvard Business School and worked it out with the military.

 

Immediately after Bush's appearance John Kerry said Bush’s honorable discharge does not settle the question of whether he skipped Air National Guard drills when he was supposed to. "Just because you get an honorable discharge does not in fact answer that question,'' Kerry told reporters.

 

In the NBC Interview Bush pledged to release any records that would clear up the matter:

 

Russert:  But you would allow pay stubs, tax records, anything to show that you were serving during that period?

 

Bush:  Yeah.  If we still have them, but I — you know, the records are kept in Colorado, as I understand, and they scoured the records.

 

And I'm just telling you, I did my duty. . . .

 

Russert:  But you authorize the release of everything to settle this?

 

Bush:  Yes, absolutely.

 

On February 10 Boston Globe reporter Walter V. Robinson -- who first reported four years ago that there was a year-long gap in Bush's record of National Guard service -- reported he had obtained two new documents that partially filled in that gap: "The personnel records. . . . constitute the first evidence that Bush appeared for any duty during the first 11 months of that 12-month period. Bush is recorded as having served the minimum number of days expected of Guard members in that 12 months of service time."

 

Later that same day the the White House released copies of those documents and others, including payroll records showing Bush had been paid for several drills during the period and was credited with meeting military point requirements for the 12-month period in question.

 

The White House said it had obtained all the documents from the Air Force Air Reserve Personnel Center in Denver, Colorado, and had not known some of them existed until Bush aides inquired after the President promised in his NBC interview to release whatever is available.

 

What the records show

 

The records show that National Guard officials credited Bush with enough points to meet minimum requirements for the 12-month period ending May 26, 1973, the period of the original alleged "gap" in his records.  An Air Force "Reserve Personnel Record Card" shows Bush received a total of 9 points for active duty training, 31 points for inactive duty training, and 15 points awarded for his membership in the reserves. The points total 56, exceeding the 50-point requirement for satisfactory service during the period, though barely.

 

Other documents include one-page Air Force Reserve summaries of points earned in the 12-month period ending in May 1973, and the subsequent period running through Bush's last credited service in July 1973. (See "supporting documents").

 

Also released were copies of microfilm payroll records summarizing the days for which Bush was paid in 1972 and 1973. Though blurry and hard to read, they reflect payments for 82 days of services in 1972 and 1973.

 

Also released was a memo the White House requested from Retired Lieutenant Colonel Albert. C. Lloyd Jr., a former personnel director for the Texas Air Guard during the time of Bush's service. Lloyd said of the payroll and personnel records, "This clearly shows that 1LT George W. Bush has satisfactory years for both 72-72 and 73-74 which proves that he completed his military obligation in a satisfactory manner."

 

Lloyd was later interviewed by the Boston Globe , which questioned whether Bush had met "minimum training" requirements in addition to "minimum retirement" credits. The newspaper said Guardsman are required to serve 15 days of active duty to meet training requirements. The Globe quoted Lloyd as saying of Bush: " Should he have done more? Yes, he should have. Did he have to? No."

 

The records also show that Bush was credited with very little service during the period when he was in Alabama working on the unsuccessful 1972 Senate campaign of Republican Winton Blunt. Bush was paid and also got retirement credit for 30 days in the first four months of 1972, through April 16. But then begins a six-month gap.

 

During those six months Bush got permission from his National Guard superiors to attend non-flying drills in Montgomery. Also during that time he was officially grounded after he failed to take an annual physical examination required to maintain flying status. But the records show Bush received no pay or credits between April 16 and late October.

 

The Boston Globe reported Feb. 12 that Bush’s suspension from flight duty while he was in Alabama “should have prompted an investigation by his commander” in Houston under Air Force regulations in effect at the time. The Globe also said “It is unclear whether Bush's commander, Lieutenant Colonel Jerry B. Killian, ordered any inquiry, as required.” Killian is deceased.

 

Guard Service in Alabama?

 

The records show Bush was paid and credited for drills on October 28 and 29, just days before the 1972 election. The records don't show where the service was performed, but this would have been toward the end of his time in Alabama. Bush was also paid and credited for four days November 11-14, 1972, around the time his aides say Bush was in Alabama briefly following the election.

 

That tends to support Bush's statement that he did perform duty in Alabama, though it falls short of conclusive proof.

 

The commander to whom Bush was supposed to report, retired Brigadier General William Turnipseed, said four years ago that he had no recollection of Bush appearing at his unit. But Turnipseed recently backed off that statement a bit, according to the a Washington Post story on February 4. Turnipseed said "he could not recall if he had been on base much at that time," the Post reported.

 

And after records were released, The Washington Times reported that a woman who had dated Bush during the summer of 1972,  Emily Marks Curtis, says she "distinctly remembers" Bush returning to Montgomery after the election to fulfill his Air National Guard commitment. "I can say categorically he was there, and that's why he came back," the Times quoted her as saying. She added that Bush rented an apartment for a two-week stay and that she met him for dinner several times. While she did not claim to have witnessed him doing Guard duty, according to the Times she said, "He told me that was why he was in Montgomery. There is no other reason why he would come back to Montgomery."

 

And in fact, Bush was at Dannelly Air National Guard base in Montgomery as late as Jan. 6, 1973, according to a document released by the White House Feb. 11. The document is a record of a dental examination of Bush on that date. The payroll records released two days earlier show Bush received pay and credit for service for Jan. 6 and for five other days closely clustered between Jan. 4 and Jan. 10.

 

On Feb. 13, the White House released hundreds of additional pages from Bush’s military records. Nothing in those files, however, provided any further documentation of Bush’s presence at Donnelly Air National Guard Base in Alabama beyond the single dental examination record.

 

An additional witness came forward to say that he had seen Bush at the base. John W. “Bill” Calhoun was quoted by the Washington Post and others as saying he saw Bush sign in at the base eight to 10 times for about eight hours each from May to October 1972. However, as previously noted, there is record of Bush being paid for only two days of Guard service during that period, Oct. 28 and 29 1972. A White House spokesman could not offer an explanation for the discrepancy.

 

 

"Not Observed" in Houston?

 

The newly released records show only sporadic service by Bush during the months immediately following the 1972 election. They show pay and credits for six days in January 1973 and two in April.

 

It was the following month that his two superior officers at Ellington Air Force Base wrote that they could not complete Bush’s annual evaluation covering the 12 months ending April 30, 1973 because "Lt. Bush has not been observed at this unit during the period of this report.” How could Bush be paid and credited for drills and still not be “observed” by his superiors? Both of them are now dead and can't answer that. White House Communications Director Dan Bartlett says Bush was doing "odd jobs" for the Guard at the time in a non-flying capacity and his superiors might not have been aware of that.

 

Also, the newly released dental record now suggests that Bush was still performing duty in Alabama, not Houston, as late as January. It is not clear where his two days of service in April, 1973 were performed, but if they were in Houston they would be the only two days of service there in the period covered by the report saying he was "not observed."

 

The records do show a flurry of activity by Bush in May, June and July, 1973, as Bush was applying for an early release from the Guard in order to attend the Harvard Business School. In those three months Bush got credit for 38 days of service, more than he got for all of 1972. His last recorded day was July 30, 1973. He was released from service with an honorable discharge eight months before the end of the six-year term of service for which he had originally signed up.

 

The Reaction

 

Release of the payroll and personnel summaries didn't quiet all the President's critics. DNC chairman McAuliffe said, ''The handful of documents released today by the White House creates more questions than answers.'' But Kerry himself said he had no comment.  "It's not an issue that I chose to create," he told reporters at Dulles airport in Washington. "It's not my record that's at issue, and I don't have any questions about it."

 

There were these other developments:

 

The Boston Globe reported Feb. 12 that Bush’s suspension from flight duty while he was in Alabama “should have prompted an investigation by his commander” in Houston under Air Force regulations in effect at the time. The Globe also said “It is unclear whether Bush's commander, Lieutenant Colonel Jerry B. Killian, ordered any inquiry, as required.” Killian is deceased.

 

The Dallas Morning News reported Feb. 12 an allegation that Bush documents were discarded in 1997. The News said a retired Guard Lieutenant Colonel, Bill Burkett, said that in 1997 he overheard then-Gov. Bush's chief of staff, Joe Allbaugh, tell the chief of the National Guard to get the Bush file and make certain "there's not anything there that will embarrass the governor."  The newspaper quoted Burkett as saying that a few days later he saw Mr. Bush's file and documents from it discarded in a trash can, and that he recognized the documents as retirement point summaries and pay forms.

 

The trash-can allegation is puzzling because the type of documents alleged to be discarded are the same type of documents that the White House produced Feb. 10 after receiving copies from and Air Force Reserve storage facility in Denver, and which the White House now cites as proof of Bush’s service.

 

The New York Times also quoted Burkett Feb. 12 as saying he overheard Bush aides requesting a review of Bush’s personnel files in 1997, but the Times did not report any allegation from Burkett that documents had been discarded. Both the Times and Dallas Morning News reported denials from various Guard officials and Bush aides that any documents had been destroyed.

 

On Feb. 13, moreover, the Boston Globe reported that Burkett’s account is contradicted by a key witness, a friend of Burkett who was present at the time and place Burkett claims to have seen documents discarded.

 

The Globe reported:

 

But a key witness to some of the events described by Burkett has told the Globe that the central elements of his story are false.

 

George O. Conn, a former chief warrant officer with the Guard and a friend of Burkett's, is the person whom Burkett says led him to the room where the Bush records were being vetted. But Conn says he never saw anyone combing through the Bush file or discarding records.

 

"I have no recall of that," Conn said. "I have no recall of that whatsoever. None. Zip. Nada."

 

 

Sources

 

 

 

Ron Fournier, “ Kerry Raises Questions About Bush Service,” The Associated Press 8 Feb. 2004.

 

Interview with Terry McAuliffe “The Big Story With John Gibson” Fox News Network 21 Jan. 2004.

 

Interview with Terry McAuliffe “This Week” ABC News 1 Feb. 2004.

 

Walter V. Robinson, “ 1-year gap in Bush’s guard duty : No record of airman at drills in 1972-73,” Boston Globe 5 May 2000: A1.

 

Walter V. Robinson, Globe Staff “ Bush Credited For Guard Drills But Time Frame Leaves Questions,” Boston Globe 10 Feb. 2004: A1.

 

Walter V. Robinson and Michael Rezendes, “ White House releases Bush’s Guard Records ,” Boston Globe 11 Feb. 2004: A1.

 

Mike Allen, “Bush's Military Record Defended; Aides Respond to Questions Spurred by Lack of Documentation,” Washington Post 4 Feb. 2004: A5.

 

Rowan Scarborough, “Bush's drills with the Alabama Guard confirmed,” The Washington Times 11 Feb. 2004.

 

Walter V. Robinson and Francie Latour, “Bush’s loss of flying status should have spurred probe,” Boston Globe 12 Feb. 2004.

 

Wayne Slater And Michelle Mittelstadt, “Aides say records show Bush served: Retired Guard officer says he saw some files discarded in trash,” The Dallas Morning News 12 Feb. 2004: A1.

 

Ralph Blumenthal, “Move to Screen Bush File in 90's Is Reported,” New York Times 12 Feb. 2004.

 

Michael Rezendes, “Doubts raised on Bush accuser ; Key witness disputes charge by Guard retiree that files were purged” Boston Globe 13 Feb 2004 : A1.

 

Manuel Roig-Franzia and Louis Romano, “Few can offer confirmation of Bush’s Guard service: Friends and acquaintances lack firsthand knowledge” Washington Post 15 Feb. 2004: A1.

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How does four months in Viet Nam make John Kerry a leader?

I guess since none of his ship mates shot him says something. What I'm not sure.

Maybe it's his Senate career where he..........What's he done?

I'm sure he must have done something in 20 years that's worth mentioning.

Hmmmmm

John Kerry says he would never go to war because he wants to go to war. It would seem that by volunteering to go to Viet Nam meant that HE WANTED TO GO TO WAR. Another flip - flop. Maybe a stretch.

I just don't see being a protester as leadership training either.

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Kerry is a lying fake. At least by now we know how Bush works and has an experienced "dad" to pull his strings. Who knows what bullshit Kerry has in store for us.
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Maybe it's his Senate career where he..........What's he done?

I'm sure he must have done something in 20 years that's worth mentioning.

Hmmmmm

yeah.. he voted down every military initiative which came across his desk.

 

Just a continuation of his show of non-support where he threw away his ribbons.

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Maybe it's his Senate career where he..........What's he done?

I'm sure he must have done something in 20 years that's worth mentioning.

Hmmmmm

yeah.. he voted down every military initiative which came across his desk.

 

Just a continuation of his show of non-support where he threw away his ribbons.

Yeah, that's it! I guess I wouldn't want to talk about that either if I were him. (gag, retch and vomit). Sorry, just got a visual on that.

 

First he said he threw away his medals. Then he said he actually threw away his ribbons, not his medals. Then he said he threw away somebody elses ribbons in a symbolic gesture.  What ever!!!

 

Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

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Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

Yeah, it's something else...the truth.

You must still be asleep! :rasp:  :banghead:  :no:

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Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

Yeah, it's something else...the truth.

You must still be asleep! :rasp:  :banghead:  :no:

If I'm still asleep, you are Rip Van Winkle.

 

Wake up and smell the coffee, Rip.  Kerry served two tours in Viet Nam.

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Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

Yeah, it's something else...the truth.

You must still be asleep! :rasp:  :banghead:  :no:

If I'm still asleep, you are Rip Van Winkle.

 

Wake up and smell the coffee, Rip.  Kerry served two tours in Viet Nam.

Then what did he do on the other tour? He only talks about his four month stay.

He has always given the impression that he spent fours months in Viet Nam and then got out and protested the war.

Is this other tour like his life changing event in Cambodia? The one that is seared into his memory.  Or is the four months a combination of the two tours?

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In Viet Nam a tour of duty was 12 months for the army, air force and navy.  For the Marines a tour was 13 months.  Two tours for Kerry would have been 2 years.  4 months is not even one tour.

 

How come no one is asking about the service of that little twit John Edwards, he's about the right age.

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Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

Kerry?  Two tours of duty?  Where..? It certainly wasn't in Vietnam!  Just to clarify what a tour is...

 

For most branches of the service, a tour of duty in Vietnam was 12 months.  Unless you were a Marine, then it was 13 months.  Most "second" tours consisted of 6 months, which is what I did.  I served 19 months 24 days.  

 

If Kerry said he did two tours of duty in Vietnam, he is a flat out lying piece of sh!t...

 

That's the only nice thing I have to say about him!

 

My opinion is, if he's elected, this country is in trouble!

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Kerry for President ??? Come on. Did those who say they will vote for Kerry because He served in Viet Nam also voted for Dole rather than Clinton ? I doubt it. This veteran believes you have more sense than that. Forget military service over 30 ys ago. What about his treasonous words when he returned from Viet Nam ?? Don't take others' word for it. Find out for yourselves - check out his "public service" in the House and Senate. He has blood on his hands today for many US troops who have died as a result of aiding the enemy's resolve with his seditionous comments against our gov't policies and President Bush. The enemy continues to attack our troops in Iraq largely due their bolstered hope that Kerry will replace Bush.  

Oh, a protector of the innocent ?....he voted against the Partial Birth abortion ban and recently spoke at a National Abortion Rights League conference where he vowed that any Supreme Court Justice he voted for will support Roe v Wade. He was for cuts in intelligence services and military systems/equipment for the last 20 ys, always pro UN, taxes, etc, etc.      :no:

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Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

Kerry?  Two tours of duty?  Where..? It certainly wasn't in Vietnam!  Just to clarify what a tour is...

 

For most branches of the service, a tour of duty in Vietnam was 12 months.  Unless you were a Marine, then it was 13 months.  Most "second" tours consisted of 6 months, which is what I did.  I served 19 months 24 days.  

 

If Kerry said he did two tours of duty in Vietnam, he is a flat out lying piece of sh!t...

 

That's the only nice thing I have to say about him!

 

My opinion is, if he's elected, this country is in trouble!

If you want to see Kerry's full record just go to JohnKerry.com.

 

Click on Biography then click on Vietnam. His whole timeline is there for your judgement.

 

He spent several months out at sea stationed at the head of one of the rivers in Nam prior to requesting a swift boat tour of duty.

 

You can also see that he volunteered for the Navy, not drafted and some other interesting facts.

 

Then you can review some of his other accoplishments for the attorney general and other things including his anti-war comments and other things.

 

Not trying to be pro Kerry here, just good to look at all perspectives of any issue.

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I have a question for all of you military experts.

 

It's common knowledge that Kerry arrived in Vietnam to take command of a swift boat on November 17, 1968.  If he only served one tour, can you explain why he was awarded the Vietnam Service Medal on April 8, 1968?

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Hey, I heard a sound bite from John Kerry the other day saying something about his 2 tours of duty. To me that means 2 trips to Viet Nam. Is this another one of his fabrications? Or something else.

Kerry?  Two tours of duty?  Where..? It certainly wasn't in Vietnam!  Just to clarify what a tour is...

 

For most branches of the service, a tour of duty in Vietnam was 12 months.  Unless you were a Marine, then it was 13 months.  Most "second" tours consisted of 6 months, which is what I did.  I served 19 months 24 days.  

 

If Kerry said he did two tours of duty in Vietnam, he is a flat out lying piece of sh!t...

 

That's the only nice thing I have to say about him!

 

My opinion is, if he's elected, this country is in trouble!

If you want to see Kerry's full record just go to JohnKerry.com.

 

Click on Biography then click on Vietnam. His whole timeline is there for your judgement.

 

He spent several months out at sea stationed at the head of one of the rivers in Nam prior to requesting a swift boat tour of duty.

 

You can also see that he volunteered for the Navy, not drafted and some other interesting facts.

 

Then you can review some of his other accoplishments for the attorney general and other things including his anti-war comments and other things.

 

Not trying to be pro Kerry here, just good to look at all perspectives of any issue.

That site has had more corrections then highway 1 running along the coast of California.

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John Kerry's Service Timeline

February 18, 1966 Kerry formally enlists in the U.S. Navy

 

August 22, 1966 Kerry reports for Naval Officer Candidate School at the U.S. Naval Training Center in Newport, Rhode Island

 

December 16, 1966 Kerry receives commission as an Ensign

January 3, 1967 Kerry reports for duty at the Naval Schools Command at Treasure Island (CA)-Takes 10 week Officer Damage Control Course

 

March 22, 1967 Reports to U.S. Fleet Anti-Air Warfare Training Center (CA). Receives training as a Combat Information Center Watch Officer.

 

June 8, 1967 Kerry reports to USS Gridley-serves in several capacities

February 9, 1968 USS Gridley departs for a Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment, to engage in operations in support of the Vietnam War. Ship spends time in the Gulf of Tonkin off North Vietnam, at Subic Bay in the Philippines and in Wellington, New Zealand

 

February 10, 1968 Kerry requests duty in Vietnam He lists his first preference for a position as an officer in charge of a Swift Boat (designated PCF for Patrol Craft Fast), his second as an officer in a patrol boat (designated PBR, for Patrol Boat River) squadron

 

May 27, 1968 USS Gridley sets sail for the US

 

June 6, 1968 Kerry arrives in Long Beach the day after Senator Robert F. Kennedy is killed in Los Angeles

 

June 16, 1968 Kerry promoted to Lieutenant, Junior Grade

 

July 20, 1968 Kerry leaves Gridley for specialized training at the Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado, CA in preparation for service as commander of a Swift Boat. These unarmored, but heavily armed, fifty foot aluminum hulled patrol boats depended on speed and agility when engaging the enemy.

 

November 17, 1968 Upon completion of his training, Kerry reports for duty to Coastal Squadron 1, Coastal Division 14, Cam Ranh Bay, South Vietnam.

 

December 1968

through January 1969 Kerry commands PCF-44

 

December 2, 1968 Kerry experiences first intense combat; receives first combat related injury.

 

December 6, 1968 Kerry moved to Coastal Division 11 at An Thoi on Phu Quoc Island

 

December 13, 1968 Kerry moved to Coastal Division 13, Cam Ranh Bay

 

December 24, 1968 Kerry involved in combat during the Christmas Eve truce of 1968. The truce was three minutes old when mortar fire exploded around Lieutenant Kerry and his five-man crew. Reacting swiftly, John Kerry and his crew silenced the machine gun nest.

January 22, 1969 Kerry and other Swift boat commanders travel to Saigon for meeting with Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, Commander Naval Forces Vietnam (COMNAVFORV), and Gen. Creighton Abrams, Commander United States Military Assistance Command Vietnam (COMUSMACV)

 

Late January, 1969 Kerry joined his 5 man crew on PCF-94

 

Late January through

Early March, 1969 Starting in late January 1969, this crew completed 18 missions over an intense and dangerous 48 days, almost all of them in the dense jungles of the Mekong Delta. Kerry's crew included engineman Eugene Thorson, later an Iowa cement mason; David Alston, then the crew's only African-American and today a minister in South Carolina; petty officer Del Sandusky of Illinois; rear gunner and quartermaster Michael Medeiros of California; and the late Tom Belodeau, who joined the crew fresh out of Chelmsford High School in Massachusetts. Others rotated in and out of the crew. The most intense action came during an extraordinary eight days of more than 10 firefights, remembered by Kerry's crew as the "days of hell."

 

February 20, 1969 Kerry and crew involved in combat; Kerry receives second combat injury – Kerry earned his second Purple Heart after sustaining a shrapnel wound in his left thigh.

 

February 28, 1969 For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Coastal Division ELEVEN engaged in armed conflict with Viet Cong insurgents in An Xuyen Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 28 February 1969. Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry was serving as Officer in Charge of Patrol Craft Fast 94 and Officer in Tactical Command of a three-boat mission. As the force approached the target area on the narrow Dong Cung River, all units came under intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from an entrenched enemy force less than fifty-feet away. Unhesitatingly, Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry ordered his boat to attack as all units opened fire and beached directly in front of the enemy ambushers. The daring and courageous tactic surprised the enemy and succeeded in routing a score of enemy soldiers. The PCF gunners captured many enemy weapons in the battle that followed. On a request from U.S. Army advisors ashore, Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry ordered PCFs 94 and 23 further up river to suppress enemy sniper fire. After proceeding approximately eight hundred yards, the boats again were taken under fire from a heavily foliated area and B-40 rocket exploded close aboard PCF-94; with utter disregard for his own safety and the enemy rockets, he again ordered a charge on the enemy, beached his boat only ten feet from the VC rocket position, and personally led a landing party ashore in pursuit of the enemy. Upon sweeping the area an immediate search uncovered an enemy rest and supply area which was destroyed. The extraordinary daring and personal courage of Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry in attacking a numerically superior force in the face of intense fire were responsible for the highly successful mission. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

March 13, 1969 For heroic achievement while serving with Coastal Division ELEVEN engaged in armed conflict with Viet Cong communist aggressors in An Xuyen Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 13 March 1969. Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry was serving as Officer in Charge of Patrol Craft Fast 94, one of five boats conducting a SEA Lords operation in the Bay Hap River. While exiting the river, a mine detonated under another Inshore Patrol Craft and almost simultaneously, another mine detonated wounding Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry in the right arm. In addition, all units began receiving small arms and automatic weapons fire from the river banks. When Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry discovered he had a man overboard, he returned upriver to assist. The man in the water was receiving sniper fire from both banks. Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry directed his gunners to provide suppressing fire, while from an exposed position on the bow, his arm bleeding and in pain and with disregard for his safety, he pulled the man aboard. Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry then directed his boat to return and assist the other damaged boat to safety. Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry’s calmness, professionalism and great personal courage under fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Lieutenant (junior grade) Kerry is authorized to wear the Combat “V”.

 

March 17, 1969 The policy of Coastal Squadron One, the swift boat command, was to send home any individual who is wounded three times in action. After sustaining his third wound from enemy action in Vietnam, Kerry was granted relief under this policy.

 

Early April, 1969 Kerry departs Vietnam

 

April 11, 1969 Kerry reports for duty at the Military Sea Transportation Service, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in Brooklyn, NY.

January 1, 1970 Kerry promoted to (full) Lieutenant

 

January 3, 1970 Kerry requests discharge

 

March 1, 1970 Kerry’s date of separation from Active Duty

 

April 29, 1970 Kerry listed as Registrant who has completed service

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Bush service time line

 

February 1968:

Bush takes an Air

Force officers test.

Scores in 25th

percentile in the pilot

aptitude portion.

Declares that he does

not wish to serve

overseas.

 

May 27, 1968:

Bush enlists in Texas Air National Guard. Aided by Texas House Speaker Ben Barnes, he jumps over waiting list. He pledges two years of active duty and four years of reserve duty.

 

June 9, 1968:

Bush's student deferment expires.

Bush on why the Air National Guard took him:

"They could sense I would be one of the great pilots of all time."

Houston Chronicle, August 1988

September 1968:

After basic training, Bush pulls inactive duty to act as gopher on Florida Senator Edward J. Gurney's campaign.

November 1968:

After Gurney wins, Bush is reactivated and transferred to Georgia.

November 1969:

Bush is flown to the White House by President Nixon for a date with daughter Tricia.

December 1969:

Bush transfers to Houston and moves into Chateaux Dijon complex. Laura lives there too, but they don't meet till later.

March 1970:

Bush gets his wings.

June 1970:

Joins the Guard's

"Champagne Unit," where

he flies with sons of Texas' elite.

November 3, 1970:

George Bush Sr. loses Senate election to Lloyd Bentsen, whose son is also in the "Champagne Unit."

November 7, 1970:

Promoted to first lieutenant. Rejected by University of Texas School of Law

January 1971:

The Guard begins testing for drugs during physicals.

Spring 1971:

Hired by Texas agricultural importer, Bush uses F-102 to shuttle tropical plants from Florida.

May 26, 1972:

Transfers to Alabama Guard unit so he can work on Senator William Blount's reelection campaign. According to his commanding officer, Bush never shows up for duty while in Alabama, nor can anyone confirm he ever serves in the Guard again. August 1972:

Bush is grounded for missing a mandatory physical.

November 1972:

Bush returns to Houston, but never reports for Guard duty.

December 1972:

In D.C. for the holidays, Bush takes 16-year-old brother Marvin drinking and driving. Confronted by father, Bush suggests they settle it "mano a mano."

October 1, 1973:

The Air National Guard relieves Bush from commitment eight months early, allowing him to attend Harvard Business School.

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