Jump to content
Indian Motorcycle Community

So What's In Your Toolbox?


Recommended Posts

Since buying and moving into my first house about a year ago, I've slowly been trying to fill my tool box. And let me be the first to say, I'm a huge fan of cheap tools. Lots of trips to harbor freight. Mainly for sockets, combo wrenches, pliers, ect ect. You know, smaller stuff that no matter how cheap, probably won't break through average garage wrenching.

 

But there's some things I'm willing to dish out the extra cash for. I'm looking at torque wrenches now, and Sears has some Craftsman's on sale. Clicker styles for only $40, but they only go up to 150ft lbs. They have a digital for about $110 that goes up to 250. Which would be perfect as i plan on doing some work in the primary side later this year.

 

Anyone use the digitals when they work on their bike? Or is it worth paying a little extra for a better name brand clicker?

Edited by RobF
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Always buy the best tools you can. I had some harbor freight socket extensions, I broke everyone of them. Having tools you cant rely on is worthless. You can buy Klein or even the Kobalt that Lowes sell are Ok. Not that much more and cheaper than buying twice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Craftsman torque wrenches are good, I got the 250 clicker for my box (s). Works great!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.seekonk.com/Cat-22-1-29/torque-gauges.htm

 

http://www.seekonk.com/Cat-41-1-62/adjustable-click-type-torque-wrenches.htm

 

these are cool! I have 3 of the gauge type, none of the click type as of yet.

Edited by CT_SPIRIT
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a bunch of tools, many of them inherited. I do have one of the long breaker-bar type torque wrenches made by MIT. It's not digital but it works well, goes to 250 ft/lbs and as I recall, was less than $100. I used it when replacing the compensator on my Gilroy (200 ft/lbs on that nut) and it hasn't come off yet. :no: I think the only digital tool I have is a caliper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

im thinkin a snap on truck to follow :nod:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dad (who was a machinist) used only the best, I use snap-on, Matco (the dealer lives next door) :grin: some stallwillie SP? and a few craftsman. I have a set of ball-head long allen sockets made by Cobalt & I would give them an A+ on quality. YMMV

 

Cheapshit toolz will fail you at the worst possible time :nod:

Edited by hasbin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That reminds me I have to get around to trading in my multitude of

 

busted up Craftsman, SnapOn & Matco tools

 

oner of these days real soon while they are still in business.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a big tool store not too far from me, I'll have to see what they have in stock for name brands.

 

I just wish Sears had that 250lbs torquer in a click style as i just can't find myself to trust the digital. The Kobalt torque wrench from Lowes does have awesome reviews though, and a lifetime warranty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How often are you going to use 250ft lbs of torque?

 

The compensator only calls for @170 ft lbs in the book.

 

Rent the 250ft pounder when you need it or go look at the pawn shop.

 

If you snap the end off the sprocket shaft, the entire engine needs to be dismantled.

 

I own a 250ft pounder click style from Matco that has served me well for 20 years.

 

If you check out the local classifieds, you can come up with good deals on loaded tool boxes.

Edited by CHIEF DOC 99
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably not a lot for such massive torques. But it does go from 50 to 250, so that's a lot of usable torque range.

 

The classifieds sound like a good plan but i don't think I'd buy a tool like that unless they had just gotten it recalibrated and had the paperwork to show it.

 

My plan was to check the torque on the compensator to verify it was at spec, then remove it to check the spring inside it. Getting some tickey tickey noises from inside the primary and want to check things out.

 

My downloaded manual says 200ft lbs for the comp nut though?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clymer & HD Manuals state 150 to 165 comp nut torques.

 

200ftlbs should be good.

 

I know the PP100s like 225ft pounds.

 

You may want to change out the compensator complete now to head off problems,

 

the compensator is a wear item that can go south over time.

 

You'll need a mapp gas torch to soften the red locktite on the comp nut.

 

You will need some red locktite to reinstall the nut.

 

 

You can make your own lock bar to lock up the engine sprocket against the clutch sprocket.

 

A piece of 1/4" plate 1 1/2" wide by 7 5/8" long with beveled ends placed

 

at 4 o'clock on the engine sprocket & 10 o'clock on the clutch sprocket locks it up

 

so you can get the torque needed to bust loose & torque the comp nut.

 

 

I use a breaker bar or torque wrench ~ never an impact gun.inside the primary ~ ever.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clymer & HD Manuals state 150 to 165 comp nut torques.

 

200ftlbs should be good.

 

I know the PP100s like 225ft pounds.

 

You may want to change out the compensator complete now to head off problems,

 

the compensator is a wear item that can go south over time.

 

You'll need a mapp gas torch to soften the red locktite on the comp nut.

 

You will need some red locktite to reinstall the nut.

 

 

You can make your own lock bar to lock up the engine sprocket against the clutch sprocket.

 

A piece of 1/4" plate 1 1/2" wide by 7 5/8" long with beveled ends placed

 

at 4 o'clock on the engine sprocket & 10 o'clock on the clutch sprocket locks it up

 

so you can get the torque needed to bust loose & torque the comp nut.

 

 

I use a breaker bar or torque wrench ~ never an impact gun.inside the primary ~ ever.

That's some solid info. Fuck it, I'll probably just change the comp nut when it comes time to dig into the primary. Pricey? I've seen threads about an HD part that matches up.

 

I bought one of those little plastic things a while back that look like steps that you can wedge in the sprocket. If I'm lucky I'll get one use out of it haha

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys are confused about tools - .The way to break any of them and make shore it's tight is the 3 foot of 1 inch pipe I use for difficult jobs . Works every time . Stuff does not come lose after that tool is used and it's was cheap - Little hard to on sockets and wrenches . But it works great - Every body should have one. :nod::outdoor::no::rock:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

craftsman tools have been made in china for a few years now ,the old stuff was pretty good tho ,

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So What's In Your Toolbox?

 

3/4 pint of Jim Beam, Condoms, Rubber gloves, Flashlight, readin Glasses, one long Shoe lace, Bungi Cord,

a piece of Bailing Wire, a few stubby allen wrenches, various colored Cable Ties, some loose change,

a piece of chalk, a shop towel, a six inch Crescent Wrench and, some cheap old expendable tools..

 

:moped:

 

Dave

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So What's In Your Toolbox?

 

3/4 pint of Jim Beam, Condoms, Rubber gloves, Flashlight, readin Glasses, one long Shoe lace, Bungi Cord,

a piece of Bailing Wire, a few stubby allen wrenches, various colored Cable Ties, some loose change,

a piece of chalk, a shop towel, a six inch Crescent Wrench and, some cheap old expendable tools..

 

:moped:

 

Dave

Sounds like you going to have a typical Saturday night..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whatever you get, don't forget to back it off to '0' when your done to save the spring action over time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A set of allen wrenches - metric for the SL and SAE for the KM. A smallish crescent wrench, a multi-tool, zip ties, bungee cords, and a mag light flashlight.

 

I also carry an extra gallon of gas when I ride to remote areas and a bottle of water when I head into the desert .. but I don't think those count as tools.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hammer, duct tape, WD40, and a pistol. What else could I possibly need?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But seriously,... I avoid cheap tools. They are usually imports, and our economy is piss-poor enough without giving our money to foreign companies while our neighbors are out of work; their homes in foreclosure. Craftsman tools have always served me well, and are not overpriced. (Too bad even they are outsourcing stuff now. When I see that I look to a different brand.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...