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When Dangerous Was Fun


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Even though I had to retire from the Ironworkers at 50 from a work injury, there are days when I wake up and wish I was going to get to climb a column or connect iron with my buddy. This Harold Lloyd piece always makes me wish I was still able to "get up there".

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I bow to you, I don't like THAT shitt at all, I will go 200mph on two wheelz but a phukin Glock to my melon wouldn't get my ass up there...

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Brother you have more guts than i do !! kudos .

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Funny how we're often compelled to do dangerous things.

 

 

Even though I had to retire from the Ironworkers at 50 from a work injury, there are days when I wake up and wish I was going to get to climb a column or connect iron with my buddy. This Harold Lloyd piece always makes me wish I was still able to "get up there".

 

I'm not anywhere near your league, but I did marital arts for most of my life. I fought in the ring in full contact matches back in the 80's. I also trained during a time before people would sue each other at the drop of a hat... training back then was brutal; I would show up for school with black eyes, bruised ribs, limping from injuries, cuts, contusions, all the rest of it... these days someone would have called CPS or the police over it.

 

I retired from training back around 2007, and the funny thing is that I miss it. I miss the work, the physical part but more so the mental part; the strategy when fighting someone and the work at perfecting movement. Most of all I miss the kinship that comes about in the training hall. We see and help and share with each other through the worst of times (injuries) and the best of times (winning a match). We all become much closer than family or friends - there's really nothing like it.

 

So now I've found an old school training hall in town, and am thinking of joining. I guess that I'm just nuts.

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It paid the bills, boys. My goal was a Masters degree in hospital administration, but by the end of my 3rd year, I knew I wasn't cut out for 'in-door' work. Plus, my young girl friend (now my wife of 35 years) got us with child, and that was the end of my BEOG and Pell grants, the VA and social security payments my dad left behind. You didn't get that once married. The question then was how to do something I liked, make enough money for my wife to stay home with the kid(s), and use the welding experience I got in Texas and the beam walking experience I'd gotten welding for the demolition crew the former Jefferson Barracks Bridge on the Mississippi in STL. Seemed like a natural. But it was fun, and the money was good, and I've got a decent pension out of it. I watched our Mom raise 5 kids by herself after dad died of a stroke at age 36. (Hence the reason I still work out and run 4 miles every other day). Didn't want my wife to have to work like Mom did. The trade allowed us to do that.

 

Ken, I know exactly how you feel, although I didn't literally get the crap beat out of me every day (often felt like it!). But the brotherhood that comes from working with proud, hardworking men is worth more than the money. And when you're in a spot where anyone could be there one minute and gone the next, it's a tight bond.

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