Jump to content
Indian Motorcycle Community

Is "pappy" Rolling In His Grave?


Recommended Posts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Article I read this morning written by a LA Times reporter mentioned Pappy in the closing paragraphs and his founding of the Sturgis rally.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HD just clawing at everything they can think of to hold on in the face of the first real competition they've had in a long time.

 

meh. probably spent a boat load of money to get this... money that would have been better spend building a better motorcycle.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

HD just clawing at everything they can think of to hold on in the face of the first real competition they've had in a long time.

 

meh. probably spent a boat load of money to get this... money that would have been better spend building a better motorcycle.

Bringing the bricks for the new plaza in on bikes? Pretty cheesy...

 

So Sturgis is a Harley event now? Sounds discriminatory. Get Al on the phone!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bringing the bricks for the new plaza in on bikes? Pretty cheesy...

 

So Sturgis is a Harley event now? Sounds discriminatory. Get Al on the phone!

 

HD is all about the cheese.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harley Davidson made of tin, ride em out and push em in.

 

Sammy Pierce 1963

 

warrior_2_zpsb0e5a1c2.jpgSam"God bless them old Indians"Pierce's Warrior

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

warrior_1_zpsc76a0b42.jpg

. This prototype was built by Sam in '67, and he dubbed it the Warrior. It was based on the Indian Scout engine, and Pierce was going to offer them in 500, 750, 825, and 900 cc displacements. You can see that the frame for the Warrior is the same 841 frame he used as the foundation of the American Rocket, but with a Scout bolt-on rigid rear section fitted. Pierce must have gotten a shitload of these 841 frames at surplus auction!

The parts were to be all NOS Indian, and Pierce definitely had the parts stash to build with. The only parts that weren't to be original Indian were the fiberglass combination gas tank/oil tank/seat unit, and the Pierce designed and Flanders-bent handlebars. This fiberglass unit was made by Don Jones of American Competition Frames, in a red metalflake (WOW!) gelcoat, with a diamond pattern leather seat. Note this combo predates the offerings in this style of both the Tracy and the Vetter units people are more familiar with.


Check out the slash cut straight pipes! , You can see the combination fuel tank/oil tank filler cap configuration. Sam Pierce was quoted as saying " 296 lbs, $25.00 per cu. in. (for the 45 cu. in.) with lights, and a guaranteed 100 mph". Also in the future plans was the option of the 841's original plunger rear suspension, and further off was the adaptation of the Indian vertical twin's full swingarm rear as well. Pierce also claimed he was ramped up to build 300 of these bikes in '68, but in reality, only a handfull of the Warriors were ever actually completed.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whoopee. Don't do a dam thing for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

HD is all about the cheese.

Let me eat a lot cheese and I can provide them with a brick. Although painful at that

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it hadn't been for HD, Sturgis and the American motorcycle culture that exists now would not be. Just giving credit where credit is due. Sorry guys. Good job Harley Davidson.

 

PS. Polaris should take notes on nurturing a culture.

Edited by badndn
  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it hadn't been for HD, Sturgis and the American motorcycle culture that exists now would not be. Just giving credit where credit is due. Sorry guys. Good job Harley Davidson.

 

PS. Polaris should take notes on nurturing a culture.

 

I imagine that if it were HD that would close down in 53 instead of Indian - and if Indian had kept going, that the Indian culture would be the same as we see with HD riders.

 

At Hollister in 47 guys were riding both HD's and Indians. The "culture" was spawned by sensationalistic reporting - lies for the most part about what really happened - and a movie (The Wild One) that seems pretty comical today. The main character in that movie was riding a Triumph. The culture came from the event and the desire of many disenfranchised WW2 vets to celebrate a lifestyle that was outside of societies norm, not from the brand of motorcycle they rode.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

:sleep3: Who give a Phat Phuk, PI has done their share to try the rewriting of history, All this hot air is for the peeps that don't even ride their motorcycles or have one for that matter :moped:

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a lot of the wankers that go up to Sturgis for the rally, they trailer their bike up there, then - and this is probably the only time they ride each year - they ride up and down Lazelle St working hard at looking cool... they rarely ride their bikes, and when they do at Sturgis many of them are drunk.

 

Thanks but no thanks.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a lot of the wankers that go up to Sturgis for the rally, they trailer their bike up there, then - and this is probably the only time they ride each year - they ride up and down Lazelle St working hard at looking cool... they rarely ride their bikes, and when they do at Sturgis many of them are drunk.

 

Thanks but no thanks.

except for the riding drunk part that's me.. lol. but I agree with every word you said! never made Sturgis, but I want to some day.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

except for the riding drunk part that's me.. lol. but I agree with every word you said! never made Sturgis, but I want to some day.

 

The Black Hills are an enjoyable place to ride - but there are a lot of places like that, or even nicer around the country. If you want to sit in traffic and be around crowds of people dressed up like pirates yelling "wooooo", then by all means go to the rally. If you want to ride and enjoy the scenery, visit the Black Hills at some other time of year.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The Black Hills are an enjoyable place to ride - but there are a lot of places like that, or even nicer around the country. If you want to sit in traffic and be around crowds of people dressed up like pirates yelling "wooooo", then by all means go to the rally. If you want to ride and enjoy the scenery, visit the Black Hills at some other time of year.

Now why did you have to bring race into it? :rotfl: The Vets returning from the war wanted a biker culture like they saw in Europe. The whole rocker/mc/macho/black leather biker thing came from Europe. Harley Davidson was at the right place at the right time. But Harley Davidson enabled the culture as they still do. Harley Davidson knows that this culture will make or break (as it almost did) them. Polaris does not recognize this. It is a commodity to Polaris. It is an ATV with two wheels. It is a Victory with a different nameplate. It is about letting the dealers market the product. THIS is why Victory failed to gain market share as hoped. That and ugly bikes with weird names.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now why did you have to bring race into it? :rotfl: The Vets returning from the war wanted a biker culture like they saw in Europe. The whole rocker/mc/macho/black leather biker thing came from Europe. Harley Davidson was at the right place at the right time. But Harley Davidson enabled the culture as they still do. Harley Davidson knows that this culture will make or break (as it almost did) them. Polaris does not recognize this. It is a commodity to Polaris. It is an ATV with two wheels. It is a Victory with a different nameplate. It is about letting the dealers market the product. THIS is why Victory failed to gain market share as hoped. That and ugly bikes with weird names.

 

Well I'm an old white guy, therefore I'm racist.. obviously.

 

I didn't know that about the origin of the 3 piece patch.. that's interesting. After WW2 my parents lived for a while in San Bernardino. Back then he joined a club called the "Pissed off Bastards" (I love that name).. and he also hung out with the Booze Fighters at the All American quite a lot. He said back then people wore sweaters with the club name on it rather than leather jackets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dunno eddie, I've seen more indian advertisements recently than ever. not sure if that's what you mean tho??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dunno eddie, I've seen more indian advertisements recently than ever. not sure if that's what you mean tho??

 

 

...you mean like this ????...thanks for stopping by yesterday..... 96FDFE7E-49E9-4986-B4D5-88037023762F_zps

Edited by harleynot
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now why did you have to bring race into it? :rotfl: The Vets returning from the war wanted a biker culture like they saw in Europe. The whole rocker/mc/macho/black leather biker thing came from Europe.

Harley Davidson was at the right place at the right time. But Harley Davidson enabled the culture as they still do. Harley Davidson knows that this culture will make or break (as it almost did) them.

Polaris does not recognize this. It is a commodity to Polaris. It is an ATV with two wheels. It is a Victory with a different nameplate. It is about letting the dealers market the product. THIS is why Victory failed to gain market share as hoped. That and ugly bikes with weird names.

 

One more thing. I've been writing an article for the local IMRG chapter, and have been thinking... (working without tools as my father used to say)

 

The culture is just as much a commodity to HD as it is to Polaris. In fact back in the 60's and early 70's HD dealers wouldn't let bikers in the dealership even to buy parts if they were wearing club colors. On a couple of occasions when I was a kid I was asked by club members to go in to the local HD dealership and buy parts for them. Pretty soon though some marketing guy at HD must have thought, hey wait a minute, people like this bad-boy image, and they began to market to it.

 

It isn't the company that makes the culture - that's done by the people who buy the bikes. It's sort of an Ouroboros sort of thing - the serpent eating it's tail; constantly re-inventing itself. People buy the bikes and by association with others who own the same bikes they create / adapt to the culture, then people who want to emulate that culture buy the bikes.

 

What will the culture of Indian be? I think this remains to be seen. I do believe though that Indian will inherit much of what has come to be called the biker culture, simply because so many HD owners are buying Indians.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...