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National Post (CA)

 

 

Since the first incorrect reports began circulating that the 9/11 hijackers had come through Canada on their way to the United States, there has been a misguided, but strangely persistent, notion circulating in Washington. D. C., to the effect that Canada hasn't done enough to ensure security at our mutual border.

 

The fact is, we have spent billions since 9/11 beefing up Canadian anti-terror security at airports, seaports and overland border crossings to prevent threats against the United States being launched from Canada. We have digitized our passports, armed our border agents and installed hundreds of millions of dollars worth of the latest technologies to speed border crossings, while also maintaining control over comings and goings to ensure plotters and bombers do not sneak through.

 

And yet, this week, Janet Napolitano, the Obama administration's new Secretary of Homeland Security, said Democrats on Capitol Hill continue to express "very real" concerns about the state of our vigilance, and have demanded "parity" between Canada's treatment and Mexico's. Anyone with any familiarity with both Mexico and Canada would find such a statement ridiculous. But apparently, many people in Washington don't fall into that category.

 

To understand how this misconception survives, one has to go back to the Democratic presidential race last spring, when both major candidates at the time -- Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama -- demogogued against the North American Free Trade Agreement, playing into accusations that it has caused millions of unionized manufacturing jobs to leave America's industrial heartland for Canada. (The actual evidence is that manufacturing jobs have left Ontario and Quebec as quickly over the past five years as they have left Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania -- most headed to China, India and other low-wage, developing nations.) In America's phobic political climate, politicians on the make are now looking to blame their country's problems on foreigners.

 

The idea that the U. S. position in regards to Mexico and Canada are somehow comparable is nothing short of ludicrous. There are no wetback Canucks sneaking across the Detroit River into the U. S., and no Canadian drug gangs are snatching hostages from the street of Chicago the way Mexican gangsters are kidnapping Mexican Americans from the streets of Phoenix and San Diego. Yet Democrats are pushing for even more stringent border controls than those that will go into effect this summer, when every Canadian entering the U. S. must produce a passport, and shipments of exports may be held up for closer scrutiny.

 

Ms. Napolitano confesses that she has little first-hand knowledge of Canada's border and has yet to visit. A former Arizona governor, she has spent most of her life there and in neighbouring New Mexico, where she grew up. In addressing the demands for parity, she acknowledged that Canadians were likely to disagree, but added: "I mention it to suggest it's something I have to deal with, and so I ask for your sympathy."

 

In kowtowing to the ill-informed demands of politicians from southwestern U. S. states, she is exhibiting the same jingoistic parochialism that Democrats have long decried as a trademark of the Bush administration. Many Canadians were rooting for Barack Obama in last year's election campaign because they assumed they'd get an administration full of urbane, well-travelled eggheads who knew the difference between Toronto and Tijuana. Instead, we get this. It will be Canadians who pay in the form of fewer, more inconvenient trips to the U. S. and slower economic growth as our exports are bottlenecked.

 

"Threats to the United States are threats to Canada," Prime Minister Stephen Harper declared as he stood next to Mr. Obama during the President's recent visit to Ottawa. "There is no such thing as a threat to the national security of the United States, which does not represent a direct threat to this country." Too bad Ms. Napolitano wasn't listening.

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National Post (CA)

 

 

Since the first incorrect reports began circulating that the 9/11 hijackers had come through Canada on their way to the United States, there has been a misguided, but strangely persistent, notion circulating in Washington. D. C., to the effect that Canada hasn't done enough to ensure security at our mutual border.

 

The fact is, we have spent billions since 9/11 beefing up Canadian anti-terror security at airports, seaports and overland border crossings to prevent threats against the United States being launched from Canada. We have digitized our passports, armed our border agents and installed hundreds of millions of dollars worth of the latest technologies to speed border crossings, while also maintaining control over comings and goings to ensure plotters and bombers do not sneak through.

 

And yet, this week, Janet Napolitano, the Obama administration's new Secretary of Homeland Security, said Democrats on Capitol Hill continue to express "very real" concerns about the state of our vigilance, and have demanded "parity" between Canada's treatment and Mexico's. Anyone with any familiarity with both Mexico and Canada would find such a statement ridiculous. But apparently, many people in Washington don't fall into that category.

 

To understand how this misconception survives, one has to go back to the Democratic presidential race last spring, when both major candidates at the time -- Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama -- demogogued against the North American Free Trade Agreement, playing into accusations that it has caused millions of unionized manufacturing jobs to leave America's industrial heartland for Canada. (The actual evidence is that manufacturing jobs have left Ontario and Quebec as quickly over the past five years as they have left Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania -- most headed to China, India and other low-wage, developing nations.) In America's phobic political climate, politicians on the make are now looking to blame their country's problems on foreigners.

 

The idea that the U. S. position in regards to Mexico and Canada are somehow comparable is nothing short of ludicrous. There are no wetback Canucks sneaking across the Detroit River into the U. S., and no Canadian drug gangs are snatching hostages from the street of Chicago the way Mexican gangsters are kidnapping Mexican Americans from the streets of Phoenix and San Diego. Yet Democrats are pushing for even more stringent border controls than those that will go into effect this summer, when every Canadian entering the U. S. must produce a passport, and shipments of exports may be held up for closer scrutiny.

 

Ms. Napolitano confesses that she has little first-hand knowledge of Canada's border and has yet to visit. A former Arizona governor, she has spent most of her life there and in neighbouring New Mexico, where she grew up. In addressing the demands for parity, she acknowledged that Canadians were likely to disagree, but added: "I mention it to suggest it's something I have to deal with, and so I ask for your sympathy."

 

In kowtowing to the ill-informed demands of politicians from southwestern U. S. states, she is exhibiting the same jingoistic parochialism that Democrats have long decried as a trademark of the Bush administration. Many Canadians were rooting for Barack Obama in last year's election campaign because they assumed they'd get an administration full of urbane, well-travelled eggheads who knew the difference between Toronto and Tijuana. Instead, we get this. It will be Canadians who pay in the form of fewer, more inconvenient trips to the U. S. and slower economic growth as our exports are bottlenecked.

 

"Threats to the United States are threats to Canada," Prime Minister Stephen Harper declared as he stood next to Mr. Obama during the President's recent visit to Ottawa. "There is no such thing as a threat to the national security of the United States, which does not represent a direct threat to this country." Too bad Ms. Napolitano wasn't listening.

 

 

 

I despise Obama...ergo.

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I despise Obama...ergo.

 

 

......... good one ! .......... but your name is not MO .......... please choose another one ........ Thank you ! :D

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......... good one ! .......... but your name is not MO .......... please choose another one ........ Thank you ! :D

 

 

whoops...I should've cited my sources. :rolleyes:

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Now they are blaming our health care system for Natasha Richardsons death. That is just hilarrious. She refused the first ambulance and they also said we dont have CT scanners yet the hospitals she went to each had them.

 

 

Al

 

 

P.S. My saying "They are" I am talking about your screwed up politians not the people of the USA.

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whoops...I should've cited my sources. :rolleyes:

 

 

........... no problemo ! we can take care of this in no time ....... with some :Beer-Chug[1]: :Beer-Chug[1]: :Beer-Chug[1]:

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National Post (CA)

 

 

Since the first incorrect reports began circulating that the 9/11 hijackers had come through Canada on their way to the United States, there has been a misguided, but strangely persistent, notion circulating in Washington. D. C., to the effect that Canada hasn't done enough to ensure security at our mutual border.

 

The fact is, we have spent billions since 9/11 beefing up Canadian anti-terror security at airports, seaports and overland border crossings to prevent threats against the United States being launched from Canada. We have digitized our passports, armed our border agents and installed hundreds of millions of dollars worth of the latest technologies to speed border crossings, while also maintaining control over comings and goings to ensure plotters and bombers do not sneak through.

 

And yet, this week, Janet Napolitano, the Obama administration's new Secretary of Homeland Security, said Democrats on Capitol Hill continue to express "very real" concerns about the state of our vigilance, and have demanded "parity" between Canada's treatment and Mexico's. Anyone with any familiarity with both Mexico and Canada would find such a statement ridiculous. But apparently, many people in Washington don't fall into that category.

 

To understand how this misconception survives, one has to go back to the Democratic presidential race last spring, when both major candidates at the time -- Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama -- demogogued against the North American Free Trade Agreement, playing into accusations that it has caused millions of unionized manufacturing jobs to leave America's industrial heartland for Canada. (The actual evidence is that manufacturing jobs have left Ontario and Quebec as quickly over the past five years as they have left Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania -- most headed to China, India and other low-wage, developing nations.) In America's phobic political climate, politicians on the make are now looking to blame their country's problems on foreigners.

 

The idea that the U. S. position in regards to Mexico and Canada are somehow comparable is nothing short of ludicrous. There are no wetback Canucks sneaking across the Detroit River into the U. S., and no Canadian drug gangs are snatching hostages from the street of Chicago the way Mexican gangsters are kidnapping Mexican Americans from the streets of Phoenix and San Diego. Yet Democrats are pushing for even more stringent border controls than those that will go into effect this summer, when every Canadian entering the U. S. must produce a passport, and shipments of exports may be held up for closer scrutiny.

 

Ms. Napolitano confesses that she has little first-hand knowledge of Canada's border and has yet to visit. A former Arizona governor, she has spent most of her life there and in neighbouring New Mexico, where she grew up. In addressing the demands for parity, she acknowledged that Canadians were likely to disagree, but added: "I mention it to suggest it's something I have to deal with, and so I ask for your sympathy."

 

In kowtowing to the ill-informed demands of politicians from southwestern U. S. states, she is exhibiting the same jingoistic parochialism that Democrats have long decried as a trademark of the Bush administration. Many Canadians were rooting for Barack Obama in last year's election campaign because they assumed they'd get an administration full of urbane, well-travelled eggheads who knew the difference between Toronto and Tijuana. Instead, we get this. It will be Canadians who pay in the form of fewer, more inconvenient trips to the U. S. and slower economic growth as our exports are bottlenecked.

 

"Threats to the United States are threats to Canada," Prime Minister Stephen Harper declared as he stood next to Mr. Obama during the President's recent visit to Ottawa. "There is no such thing as a threat to the national security of the United States, which does not represent a direct threat to this country." Too bad Ms. Napolitano wasn't listening.

I wish we would become one country and get rid of the border all together! But then again our welfare system needs to be revamped! We can call ourselves Untited States of North America!! :rolleyes:

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Not saying they are "somewhat comparable" - but I'm not saying they're not either. Fact is all three countries have varying degrees of committment to get the job done. Between our two neighbor countries - I have witnessed Canadian border guards to be harder and far more discerning.

 

Funny - I have crossed both borders - several times. Canada was known for some time as an easy pot crossing in the 60's and 70's. And some of the enforcement of both borders just seems wierd.

 

I have observed more harrassment for carrying Canadian beer across the border than anything else. I have seen Canadians - whom I was traveling with - hassled harder than anyone as they returned home to Canada. Then there is the article about the BC-Washington State tunnel (copied below from BBC News)

 

As far as Mexico goes.....In 2004 I made 3 border crossings in a night (4 in the long weekend) as we helped Braveheart - who had broken his arm in a fall in the Mardigras rain in Mexico - trying to get him and his bike home. Never stopped for more than a "what's your purpose" question and then waived through. As I have rode "near the border" I have been stopped at several "Immigration Checkpoints" - 100+ miles NORTH of the Mexican Border. Saw one most recently NORTH of Tombstone - uhhhhhhhhhhh if they are this far incountry they're long gone. I have even passed through not showing any ID and my face fully covered in the cold of winter - I guess they liked my Indian - LOL :D In 2002 during my cross country ride I overnighted in Del Rio Texas on the way up to Big Bend National and State Parks - kids were pouring into town from all over Texas and whooping it up good. After a bunch of 'em talked up Mexico I decided to ride on in for the first time (for me) - rode across the bridge - waived through by Mexican border patrol. Parked for an hour and walked the town until I got fed up watching my 40th kid puke to shots chants in a bar and endless propositions for a "Taxi Ride" to some seedy part of town. Came back across into Del Rio and was waived right in. As I crossed the fenced bridge I looked at the desert and river below - easy crossings could be envisioned there. Saw on TV the other day that the guy in charge of the US side of the El Paso border drug war was responsible for the area all the way down to Del Rio - THAT is a lot of real estate. Most of it National Park, forrest, State Park or secluded Ranch land.

 

The other thing about Canada vs Mexico Borders is weather and the Boundary waters and Great Lakes "protects" a lot of it. And if they were canoeing it across we probably wouldn't know anyway. I'm sure there is lots of cross border hunting. trapping, snowmobiling, cross country skiing, camping and fishing that goes on there. Who knows how many "border violations" are ocurring there?

 

National Post (CA)

.......The idea that the U. S. position in regards to Mexico and Canada are somehow comparable is nothing short of ludicrous. There are no wetback Canucks sneaking across the Detroit River into the U. S., and no Canadian drug gangs are snatching hostages from the street of Chicago the way Mexican gangsters are kidnapping Mexican Americans from the streets of Phoenix and San Diego. Yet Democrats are pushing for even more stringent border controls than those that will go into effect this summer, when every Canadian entering the U. S. must produce a passport, and shipments of exports may be held up for closer scrutiny.

 

 

US-Canada drug tunnel uncovered

Police in the United States have shut down a 360ft (120 metre) drug-smuggling tunnel under the US-Canadian border.

Three men from the province of British Columbia in Canada were arrested in the US and charged with drugs offences.

 

The tunnel, which emerged in the living room of an abandoned home on the US side, is the first to be discovered along the US-Canada border.

 

It was only used briefly to smuggle marijuana, police say, but would also have been used to move people and guns.

 

Drugs gangs from British Columbia smuggle millions of dollars' worth of Canadian marijuana to the US every year.

 

No suspicion

 

The tunnel runs from a large metal shed in Langley in Canada to a home in Lynden, Washington, in the US.

 

Canadian customs officials became suspicious when they saw a lot of wood and iron disappearing into the shed in February.

 

They alerted US officials, who installed secret cameras and microphones.

 

 

Francis Devandra Raj, 30, who owned the hut in Langley, Timothy Woo, 34, and Jonathan Valenzuela, 27, were arrested soon after they began to use the tunnel.

 

The tunnel, which was equipped with lights and ventilation, is thought to have taken about a year to construct. It was lined with wood and reinforced with concrete and metal. A small cart had also been installed to move goods and people.

 

"It was well built, probably one of the most sophisticated tunnels we've ever seen," said Rod Benson, of the US Drug Enforcement Administration.

 

Neighbours said that despite the scale of the construction work, their suspicions were not aroused.

 

"I'm a kind of nosey person... and I have never seen any activity to speak of," Mike Hamm, who lives near the tunnel's Canadian entrance, was quoted by Reuters as saying.

 

The owner of the property on the US side has not been detained, but police say they are still investigating.

 

More than 30 tunnels have been discovered running from the US across the border to Mexico.

 

Story from BBC NEWS:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/americas/4706339.stm

 

Published: 2005/07/22 12:53:31 GMT

 

© BBC MMIX

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The funny thing about all this when I cross into the states the american border guards check me. If some terrorist gets through how is that the canadian border guards fault? If our security is lax wouldnt that mean they are coming in from the states?

 

 

 

 

 

Al

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Please take him up North and let him be your Prime Minister then...

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Please take him up North and let him be your Prime Minister then...

 

 

Not a chance our government is screwed up enough as it is. :P

 

 

Al

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I would take Mr. Harper as our leader in a heartbeat, you guys are very lucky to have him.

 

I came across this article I found interesting.

 

http://www.yankeemagazine.com/issues/2009-...s-canada-border

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I would take Mr. Harper as our leader in a heartbeat, you guys are very lucky to have him.

 

I came across this article I found interesting.

 

http://www.yankeemagazine.com/issues/2009-...s-canada-border

71049265.JPG Mr. Harper

http://www.craigmarlatt.com/canada/images/...ment/harper.jpg Mr. Harper

http://www.comanchetrail.net/leadership/images/harper-0.jpg Mr. Harper

mr_harper.jpg Mr. Harper

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I would take Mr. Harper as our leader in a heartbeat, you guys are very lucky to have him.

 

I came across this article I found interesting.

 

http://www.yankeemagazine.com/issues/2009-...s-canada-border

 

 

 

 

yep he is the best available to us at this time. B)

 

 

 

 

Al

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I wish we would become one country and get rid of the border all together! But then again our welfare system needs to be revamped! We can call ourselves Untited States of North America!! :rolleyes:

What about the Maple Leaf? :P

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Hey, Canada is lookin better every damn day.................. never thought I would entertain the thought, but the highway to hell this country is on, that may be the last bastion of hope for anyone with a clue, movin to the cold north where the, shall we say, u.s. "democrats" won't go.

 

edit: that's not a reference to any "race", just people with the agenda of destroying what this country was founded on and for.

Edited by aikenscout
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Hey A.S....come on up.....riding season the east coast...April...Nov....rest of the time repairin/accesorizin...scouts

Pete (Micmac) flirted the idea a while back!

 

Safe ridin

M

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